Cider Press Hill

Avast, me hearties!

Wednesday, 2:15 pm

By KateC

Sep

15

2004

Do you know what Sunday is?
You don’t?  Well, Go Find Out!



 

Project Censored

Wednesday, 7:33 am

By KateC

Sep

15

2004

Project Censored 2005: The Top 25 Censored Media Stories of 2003-2004. I would be hard-pressed to select one story that stands out above the others, however, I might consider High Levels of Uranium Found in Troops and Civilians a contender. It’s sad reading, but it should be read.

Project Censored explains: “The Mission of Project Censored is to educate people about the role of independent journalism in a democratic society and to tell The News That Didn’t Make the News and why.

Project Censored is a media research group out of Sonoma State University which tracks the news published in independent journals and newsletters. From these, Project Censored compiles an annual list of 25 news stories of social significance that have been overlooked, under-reported or self-censored by the country’s major national news media.”

(link via Rogi: Live and Direct)



 

Oxymoron, apparently

Tuesday, 12:44 pm

By KateC

Sep

14

2004

Why is conservation viewed as a liberal word? Conservation: An occurrence of improvement by virtue of preventing loss or injury or other change. Conservative: Resistant to change, avoiding excess, moderate, cautious.  What could be more conservative than conservation? Conservative conservationist should be a redundancy, not an oxymoron.



 

Roadless Forest Conservation Rule endangered

Tuesday, 11:39 am

By KateC

Sep

14

2004

Call to action by environmentalists. Reported, September 8, by the BushGreenwatch newsletter, to which I have subscribed for some time. It is an invaluable source of activist information regarding our environment and ongoing political shenanigans.

Soon after the Bush administration took office, it promised to uphold the Clinton administration’s Roadless Area Conservation Rule, enacted in 2001 to protect some 58.5 million acres of America’s last unspoiled National Forests from logging, mining and drilling.

But this summer President Bush flip-flopped. The administration’s U.S. Forest Service announced it is repealing the rule, which was designed to protect vital sources of clean water and wildlife habitat. Since the year 2000, the timber industry alone has given $25 million to the Bush administration and its Congressional allies.

The Bush reversal has set off a torrent of protests by the conservation community, which is calling on Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth to extend the public comment period beyond the current expiration date set for next Tuesday, September 14th. The environmental community is calling for a 45-day extension.

Conservationists feel especially betrayed not only by the Bush flip-flop, but also because the rule was enacted by the Clinton administration only after three full years of open public dialogue and extensive scientific analysis. Over 600 public hearings were held nationwide. A record 1.5 million comments were submitted, with over 95% supporting the Roadless Rule. Yet the Bush administration is now portraying the rule as a last-minute process.

According to a recent study by the Campaign to Protect America’s Lands (CPAL), the Bush repeal not only endangers the nation’s few remaining unspoiled forests, but also threatens 23 nearby national parks and monuments in 16 states. [1] Among them are Yosemite, Yellowstone, Rocky Mountain and Olympic National Parks. The 23 sites are visited by some 40 million Americans every year.

As CPAL Director Peter Altman told BushGreenwatch, “The parks will suffer from the collateral damage of timber clearcuts, destroyed wildlife habitats and migratory corridors, streams destroyed by sediment, and the noise and stench of industrial development."

Coalition of Concerned National Park Service Retirees spokesperson Bill Wade called on Interior Secretary Gale Norton to oppose the action by the Forest Service, which is part of the Department of Agriculture. “No Interior Secretary worth his or her salt would stand by and allow this indirect attack on our national parks to go unchallenged,” said Wade.

Owing to an outpouring of citizen protest, BushGreenwatch was able to announce, on Friday (9/10):

NOTE: Thanks to an outpouring of citizen protests (BushGreenwatch, Sept. 8), the U.S. Forest Service announced on Wednesday that it will extend the public comment period to November 15 on its plan to rescind the Roadless Forest Conservation Rule. The rule calls for 58.5 million acres of America’s National Forests to be protected from logging, mining and drilling. The Service had earlier set a deadline of September 14 for public comments. Comments may be sent to: http://ga1.org/campaign/roadless?source=hp.

Please click the above link and add your voice and opinion before the public comment period ends in November.



 

I Broke it

Tuesday, 10:16 am

By KateC

Sep

14

2004

I broke the blog last night. But I think I’m back online now. A few wrinkles to iron out yet, but feels good to be visible again! Thanks to Nevin and pMachine Hosting for bailing me out of another fine mess that I got myself into. ;)



 

Cookie Troubles

Monday, 8:20 pm

By KateC

Sep

13

2004

A couple of people have indicated that they can’t leave comments here. They either get a message that the comment can’t be currently accepted or they need to leave a valid email address—which is decidedly odd since I am not requiring email addresses for comments. So I don’t know what I’ve done. I’m pretty sure it’s cookie related. Trying to sort it out. If anyone else is having trouble with comments or anything else with the site, you can, as always, get in touch with me at ciderpresshillATgmail.com. 



 

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